purpose medieval

 

Churches for a purpose:
  • The name of Aldwincle is derived from the two elements ‘Ealda’s nook’. Ealda was the landowner and the village sits in a line of hills beside the valley of the River Nene...
  • This archetypal medieval church is set in the heart of the village. It abuts a clearly later square tower (1633) topped by a good spire and on the south side a chapel, refashioned in 1621...
  • A 14th/15th century building with very good furnishings. 15th century Rood Screen and pews,17th century three decker pulpit, 18th century box pews. The stained glass dates from the mid...
  • The village of Barnwell has two churches. The parish church of at Andrews and the remains of All Saints. The latter was largely demolished in 1825 but it’s chancel was maintained...
  • This pleasantly remote church stands at the end of a short walk shaded by ancient trees, with the vestiges of the 18th century mansion of the O’Brien family to your left. Beyond it...
  • A Norman church largely rebuilt in the fourteenth century. Still with a good Norman font with intertwined monsters, fish and seemingly incongruously a cross. A medallion containing the...
  • A 13th century church considerably extended in the 14th century in the perpendicular style. Restored in 1870 by Slater and Carpenter with pew ends carved by the then incumbent, the Revd...
  • A handsome medieval local iron stone church set in pleasantly wooded church yard off the High Street. The single most surprising object to be found here is though inside – a remarkable...
  • Sitting on top of the hill, just across the road from Canons Ashby House, this church is also looked after by the National Trust. It is a fragment of the west end of the nave of the Augustinian...
  • The Church which lies adjacent to the House but which it antedates by some 400 years. It must have been used by the Bishops of Coventry whose seat this was before the advent of the Comptons...
  • One of the most rewarding of the county’s churches to visit all be it that it is best to arrive accompanied by a passenger otherwise you have to deal with the gated road from the...
  • One of the finest medieval churches in the county well set above the village green, off the main road, and adjacent to the mainly seventeenth century manor house. Elements of an earlier...
  • The tall Saxon tower is the oldest part of this church, which was rebuilt in the 16th century and then again, rather enthusiastically, in the mid 19th century. The latter was undertaken...
  • Originally a Norman church (west door) with a wide tall chancel added in 1338 when a college here was founded by John Giffard, Canon of York. It seems to have been the largest private collegiate...
  • Well done if you have got here! The church is tucked away in the estate village that lies behind Courteenhall Hall. If that was not enough the M1 sealed its remoteness cutting it off from...
  • St Andrew’s Church dates from the time of King Henry II (1154 -89). Its Norman arcade and additions from every subsequent medieval century, give this church a rich and varied history...
  • The north - west part of the county has a group of large well- built villages that have the quality of an 18th century town. Crick is amongst these with a very pleasant variety of buildings...
  • The remarkable feature of this church is the series of 14th century wall paintings which were discovered almost a century ago by Professor Ernest Tristram, the authority on such works and...
  • A quintessential country church standing alongside the village street from where you can look out across country that rolls away to the southern county border. Whilst the exterior is an...
  • The building is early 14th century with a slightly later tower and then restored by Lord Alwyne Compton who on this occasion employed William Slater. Having visited Castle Ashby Lord Alwyne...
  • St Mary’s Church is all that remains of the Medieval village of Easton Neston when, following the enclosure of the land, the village was transferred to Hulcote. The church stands...
  • The church is set at the far end of the village and from here you get wonderful views over the Welland valley. The building itself represents a splendid silhouette with a splendid tower...
  • A fine looking medieval church, built between 1200 and 1340, with a prominent interestingly decorated west tower. You enter through the late medieval porch which is unusually inscribed...
  • However you reach it Edgcote feels removed from daily life – out of time. Down a lane you encounter the balanced composition of church & rectory, Manor House, stables & dovecote...
  • A large grand church set in the heart of this village positioned on a knoll. Before rushing inside stray round the back as here you will not only get a very good view but also encounter...
  • The setting of the church a little way from the village, remains untouched by the 20th and 21st centuries. It is at the south end of the village adjacent to Eydon Hall, a Grade 1 neo-classical...
  • It will be primarily the late 19th century / 20th century stained glass that will draw you to this small medieval church at the centre of this handsome ironstone village. The church itself...
  • A romantic church that stands alone, shorn of it’s former medieval village, looking out across the Capability Brown landscape of 1760’s toward Fawsley Hall, the seat of the...
  • Don’t give up on your search for this church. It is well worth the effort. You will find it at the far west end of the village overlooking countryside. A large building constructed...
  • A Royal church with yet further royal associations: a very significant victim of the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The village, Manor , and church had been royal property since the Conquest...
  • This remote church at the most southern point of the county is beguilingly set at the end of a long tree lined lane which is well indicated by a brown sign off the main Northampton / Milton...
  • Another very early church with a Norman tower incorporating a late Saxon door case and internally a Norman font. The main body of the church though dates from the 13th / 14th centuries....
  • An enchanting stone-built village set in beautiful countryside surrounding Boughton House, a stately home and estate of 11,000 acres that is one of the seats of the Duke of Buccleuch....
  • A royal village indelibly linked with Edward lV ‘s Queen. Elizabeth Woodville and with Charles ll who gave this crown property to his natural son Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Grafton. In...
  • A late 13th/early 14th century gothic church with interventions in the 18th century – the pulpit, and in the 19th century – stained glass. On the outside huge grotesque gargoyles...
  • The church dates from circa 1300 but it is the intervention of the Spencer family of nearby Althorp that transform the Medieval building. Sir John Spencer (d. 1522) rebuilt the chancel...
  • The church stands some way from the village, isolated but not austere. St Peter and St Paul dates back to the early years of the 14th century although the narrow aisles were added one hundred...
  • A wonderful juxtaposition of medieval England and the advance of 19th century technology. This towered and spired church, built in both limestone and ironstone, lies adjacent to the great...
  • The medieval church has a fine west tower circa 1500. Internally restored by William Slater in 1859/60 (he was born in the village) and later the chancel more elaborately by F. Butler with...
  • The church owes it’s grandeur to the fact that the town was, and still is part of the Duchy of Lancaster. The fascinating ancillary buildings – Bede House, the college and the...
  • The name Holdenby dates back to the time of Scandinavian settlements and derives from the personal name ‘Halfdan’ (or Haldane) and the word ‘by’ meaning farm. The...
  • Despite being in the busy Nene Valley between Wellingborough and thrapston, Irthlingborough church seen from the far side of the river retains a timeless and surprisingly isolated quality...
  • This noble medieval building remains the dominant architectural feature of this ancient market town. It’s handsome tower and tall spire is strikingly visible especially from the south...
  • All Saints and Saint James Church stands on an imposing site with the east wall of the chancel facing Hall Yard. The present rectory is a fine Georgian building which was formerly a mill...
  • You can spot this church from miles away although it lies in the Cherwell Valley. Its spire, dating from circa 1370 is both the most beautiful and one of the tallest in the county (60 metres...
  • Whilst the tower is medieval the church was so re built in the 17th and 18th century and that is it’s overriding appearance. The vestry though was added by Bodley, 1879. Internally...
  • Of early medieval origin but almost entirely rebuilt during 15th century and especially fine example of Perpendicular architecture, most notably its splendid lantern tower. From the former...
  • St Peters is on the highest point of the village believed to have been the site of worship since pagan times.  The present building dates from 1100 and has been extended over the...
  • A Church of 17th century surprises during the reign of Charles the 1st the rector here was Charles Chauncey who falling foul of archbishop Laud left for America to become President of Harvard...
  • The Victorian church par excellence in the south part of the diocese. Giles Gilbert Scott was appointed by the Rev. W. C. Buckley in the early 1860’s to restore this church to an...
  • From the outside the church initially presents itself as a confident 19th century re build of a medieval foundation. This is the outcome of Sir Giles Gilbert Scott’s restoration of...
  • The church is now looked after by The Churches Conservation Trust. One of the best Norman Churches in Britain. It’s sophistication in design and ornament is a reflection of the national...
  • A large 14th /15th century church with a slightly earlier tower impressively placed at the edge of the village near the former Norton Hall formerly a seat of the Knightley family of Fawsley...
  • The adjectives used to describe this church are consistently ‘beautiful and elegant’ and so it is. Whilst there is evidence of its earlier incarnation – it was founded...
  • This fine church, set in the tiny hamlet of Passenham, dates back to the 13th /14th century but was largely rebuilt in the early 17th – upper stages of the tower, the nave roof, and...
  • Two distinct reasons for coming here: the rare medieval wooden effigies; and the association with the great non-conformist missionary William Carey (1761 – 1834). A well-positioned...
  • This church has strong American associations as during the Second World War some 6,000 men and women of the 351st Heavy Bombardment Group Eight, United States Army Airforce, was stationed...
  • Preston – the ‘priests’ farm’ was also known formerly as Preston juxta Northampton and Preston Juxta Piddington. From about 1720 the current suffix was adopted,...
  • The church stands on rising ground above the main road. The first thing you see is the great west tower, richly ornamented, with spire above (the latter replaced in 1821 after a fire).The...
  • There are two reasons for visiting Rothwell - The Church of the Holy Trinity and the Market House. The church was large, even in Norman times and grew from the 14th century onwards. It...
  • One of the outstanding late medieval churches in the county. Whilst there remains evidence of an earlier church what you largely see today dates from the early 1400’s. On the outside...
  • The church stands at the highest point of the village and dates from the 12th / 13th century. It was largely built under the auspices of the Lucy family whose crest of three pike can be...
  • The tower is well buttressed and unusually decorated. The first is accounted for by the susceptibility of the earth to subside on account of the Romans extracting iron stone from the vicinity...
  • A Norman church with plenty of Norman remains. It’s the tower that catches your eye on arrival, 11th century in origin but as your eyes rise you will see it blends in to Early English...
  • This particularly fine church was built during the first half of the 14th century and there have been little alterations since then. It gives a very good impression of English gothic architecture...
  • Set in the gardens of Steane Park this is a rare church built in the gothic style in 1620. Whereas Tom Tower in Oxford can be seen as Wren’s essay in Gothic Revival, Steane is one...
  • A handsome, light and well-proportioned church built in local limestone. Constructed circa 1250 -1300 and very likely restored by E.W. Law (1850-1872) and again by J.C. Traylen (1890/1)...
  • The church, like the village is indelibly linked to the family of George Washington. Lawrence Washington bought the manor here in 1540 and this is where the family remained until 1659....
  • Set in the estate village of Lilford Hall this cruciform medieval church with its fine tower and spire was restored by lord Lilford and his architect William Slater in the 1860’s...
  • Externally it is the late 15th century tower that grabs one’s attention. It was built by Lord Lovel, Lord Chamberlain to Richard lll. It is by far and away one of the most impressive...
  • Here is a large town church that speaks of the 15th century in 1483 Edward IV the husband of Elizabeth Woodville of nearby Grafton Regis, gave a large grant of stone from the royal quarries...
  • This curious box-like Norman church stands between the very busy A45 and the grounds of Upton Hall, now a school. The church was built between 1158 and 1189 and is constructed of local...
  • The church is a sole survivor of a complex of medieval and Jacobean buildings which constituted first Warkworth Castle and from the 17th century a large Jacobean house. In 1805 the non...
  • It’s the nave’s roof. When you would expect to see soaring stone vaults here you find a late gothic wooden roof instead (albeit restored by G.G. Scott in 1876). It’s like...
  • Much is currently being done to conserve and revive this fine 14th century building. This is a joint endeavour between the enthusiastic village community and the Heritage Memorial Fund....
  • A distinctive building with a stone striped tower and soaring spire. Medieval in origin, with regular gothic arches and wide well lit aisles and side chapels, today it is a fascinating...
  • A remarkably fine perpendicular church built to the orders of one man, Anthony Catesby ( 1500 – 1554) of the significant Northamptonshire Catholic family whose main seat was at Ashby...
  • The ancient village centre stands above the flood plain of the river Nene. This now lies at the far end of the village which grew considerably in the late 19th century when the local iron...

Your login details have been used by another user or machine. Login details can only be used once at any one time so you have therefore automatically been logged out. Please contact your sites administrator if you believe this other user or machine has unauthorised access.